How IndyCar technology wound up in your kid’s car seat [w/video]

Filed under: Etc., Safety, Videos

Dorel Juvenile Group

“What I’m assembling is potentially going to save someone’s life. You can’t just go anywhere to get that.” – Mark Evanko

From their first day on the job, employees at Dorel Juvenile Group learn to never treat the products they make like just another piece of plastic.

The 950 people who work at the company’s Columbus, Indiana factory work three shifts round the clock to build four million child car seats a year. The seats must withstand violent impacts and save the lives of the children sitting in them.

That responsibility remains at the forefront of every decision the company makes – from the type of plastic and foam it uses to investing in technology inspired by the auto racing industry. These seats could be made outside the US for less money, but Dorel makes it a point to look beyond the bottom line.

“Overseas, they sell you something, and the employees aren’t tied to what you’re about,” said Mark Evanko, senior vice president of quality control at Dorel. “Here there’s this intrinsic feeling that what I’m assembling is potentially going to save someone’s life. You can’t just go anywhere to get that.”

Continue reading How IndyCar technology wound up in your kid’s car seat [w/video]

How IndyCar technology wound up in your kid’s car seat [w/video] originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 23 May 2014 10:15:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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